Cricut · DIY

Cricut Makeathon Class Handout

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon
Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon

Last week I had the pleasure of joining a host of Cricut enthusiasts in Salt Lake City, Utah for the Cricut Mountain Make-a-thon.  I had an absolute blast being among fellow Cricuteers and all the great people from Cricut. 

I was invited to teach at the event and I chose to discuss Box Cards, which are a particular passion of mine.  Unfortunately the handout that I prepared didn’t get distributed, so I figured I would post it here for anyone who attended the class and even people who couldn’t make it.

So here it is…I hope you find it helpful and don’t forget you can always contact me by e-mail at: missritatotherescue@gmail.com!


Handout: From FLAT to Fab: Making Box Cards with your Cricut

​What is a Box Card?

For a card to be considered a box card, it needs to have one feature–it must be able to fold flat for easy mailing and then pop back up to show off its three dimensional beauty.  As you can see from the cards showcased here, not all of the box cards are square…but all of them fold flat and are easily mailable.

 

 

Hello Box Card
Hello Box Card from All Occasion Box Cards in Cricut Design Space

 

About today’s project:

The project we did today is from the Cricut cartridge “All Occasion Box Cards” by Lori Whitlock, who is considered the leading designer of box cards and variations of the box card theme.  We did the “Hello Box Card” Design (pictured above).    If you are interested in this cartridge and need the handbook, you can find it here: http://content.cricut.com/b/pdfs/res/handbooks/all_occasion_box_cards_handbook.pdf

For all the projects on this cartridge, you will need to resize the files.  This is very important, because using the files straight from Design Space will result in a very small card.  If you choose to use the envelope that comes with each box card, Cricut recommends you resize the entire file’s height to about 10.8″. 

For even more specific instructions, please visit the Cricut sizing guide for each of the cards on this cartridge, which you can find here at the end of the handbook on page 41: All Occasion Box Card Resizing Guide.  

Sizing Template for All Occasion Box Cards
Sizing Template for All Occasion Box Cards by Lori Whitlock

 

 

Or you can use my tip about resizing, which is to ungroup the entire file, eliminate the envelope and then  sandwich all of the images on top of each other.  Once your elements are sandwiched neatly, go ahead and re-group them and resize the entire design to 10.5″.  The resulting card will fit nicely into a pre-made 5″ x 7″ envelope.  Here is a visual of that:

Resizing box card files
Screenshot of how to ungroup and resize the All Occasion Box Card designs so they will fit in a 5″ x 7″ pre-made envelope

 


 

Screen Shot 2018-04-03 at 3.44.57 PM

About me:

My name is Ritamarie Cavicchio, but a lot of people call me Miss Rita because of my “Miss Rita to the Rescue!” website and blog.​  I have been creating things for as long as I remember.  I am an accomplished soap maker and herbal/aromatherapy artisan.  In addition, I love to make things with my Cricut Maker.  My favorite things to make are cards, but I do dabble in home decor and iron on projects.  I also knit, sew, cook and bake.

I am a blogger and a Cricut Product Expert.  I like to blog about Cricut related news, recipes, home economics, corgis (my favorite breed!) and my 12 year old son (aka MO) who has Autism.  When my son MO was diagnosed with autism at the age of 2, I chose to take a break from my successful small business “La Diva Bella” to care for him.  Now that he has grown and is in doing well, I am eagerly looking for ways to express myself creatively.

​You can find my blog at: MissRitaToTheRescue.com

On Facebook, you can find me under my name: Facebook.com/RitamarieCavicchio and my Facebook Page: Facebook.com/MissRitaToTheRescue.

In 2013 I started one of the first Facebook groups for Cricut users.  Since then, my groups have expanded into three very large groups that are managed by a team of great moderators.  You are welcome to join any of them!  Simply search for them by the names below and request to join:
Cricut Newbies & Pros for Explore and Maker
Cricut Newbies & Pros for Expression, Personal and Create (the legacy Cricut machines)
Cricut Newbies & Pros for BUSINESS (for starting and maintaining a Cricut based business)

I sell my handmade designs at my hometown marketplace (Peabody Pop Up Market) and I also have an Etsy shop (etsy.missritatotherescue.com).

​I am also on Pinterest /missritatotherescue  and on Instagram at /ritamariecavicchio


 

Buying and using SVGs from designers in Cricut Design Space:

Lori is a wonderful designer and, in addition to her two Cricut cartridges, she also has a large selection of SVGs that you can purchase on her site: Lori Whitlock’s SVG Shop.  

I recently posted a very extensive response to a question I received about the best sites for buying SVGs.  While there are many great designers out there and on Etsy, my post covers my top picks for the most beautiful, best designed and well thought out SVG files. Check out the post here:

https://ritamariecavicchio.wordpress.com/2018/07/15/finding-beautiful-svg-files-for-your-cricut-crafting/

Anna Griffin recently jumped into the box card realm with her brand new Cricut cartridge called “Anna’s Window Box Cards”, which is available in Design Space or from HSN.  I now own this cartridge and it produces really stunning Print Then Cut Window Box cards like this one:

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Quick tips on the new Cricut Scoring Wheel:

The new Cricut Scoring Wheel is a major new innovation for the Cricut Maker and does a fabulous job of scoring files!  If you don’t have a Cricut Maker, the Cricut Scoring Stylus still works in Explore machines and also the Maker.

Remember that most materials will use the 01 Scoring Tip, but do keep your 02 handy for use with thicker materials such as glitter cardstock, sparkle paper and kraft board.

To prevent cracking while using the scoring tool, you can face your paper “fancy side down”

When removing your Scoring Wheel, remember to check that you replaced the fine point blade housing correctly or it will not cut your project.

Scoring Wheel for Cricut Maker
Scoring Wheel for Cricut Maker
Cricut

Using Pens With Your Cricut

Example of a card with scoring and writing
Card ready to be made; contains both a scoring line and writing with a pen

For my friend Debbie’s birthday, I gifted her Cricut’s January Mystery Box.

While I realize sending a birthday present full of unknown products is usually an “iffy” proposition, I figured I was safe because she is known to proclaim that her “favorite color is glitter” AND because this month’s box was marketed as being “elegant”.  Well, I am happy to report my gamble paid off.  Her Mystery Box contained a hefty amount of glittery and shiny items. In addition, she was elated to find two packages of pens for writing, which prompted me to write this blog post.

Debbie is a long time crafter, but is still learning how to use her new Maker.  I told her I would publish a post on how to use pens in her Cricut, so that everyone can get a little tutorial (or refresher) on how to do it.

For this example, I am using two cards that I got from vast Cricut Make It Now project collection.  Fortunately, these cards came all set up with both scoring lines and pen marks, so when I go to make it my machine already knows (and tells me) I will be needing my Scoring Stylus and also a Pen:

Tools you will use on project

If you have more than one additional tools in a project–as I have in this one–your Cricut will tell you which one to load first and then also prompt you to change tools.  In this case, I am to load my Scoring Stylus (into the left clamp/Clamp A) first and then load the pen afterwards.  Cutting is always done last with a project.

After my Cricut scores the card stock, it will ask you to change the tool…like this:

Reminder to add your pen

Make sure you are careful about changing out the tools; don’t tug too hard on the scoring stylus when removing, but also make sure your pen is firmly in place as well.

After you change out the stylus for the pen, you will see the machine actually drawing on your cardstock, as shown in this example:

Drawing your project

And once the writing/drawing is complete, the Cricut will proceed with the final step, cutting your card.

And–believe it or not–that’s all there is to it!

If you don’t want to be limited by using pre-made cards from the Make It Now section (although you may be surprised at how many projects are there!), I will post a “Part 2” to this project in a bit that will show you how to make a card from scratch that uses the drawing technique.  So check back later for more info, please.